Leadership BITES

Patricia White, CEO of the charity 'Suited for Success'

June 08, 2020 Guy Bloom Season 1 Episode 8
Leadership BITES
Patricia White, CEO of the charity 'Suited for Success'
Chapters
Leadership BITES
Patricia White, CEO of the charity 'Suited for Success'
Jun 08, 2020 Season 1 Episode 8
Guy Bloom

I speak to the hugely motivational Patricia White who is the CEO of Birmingham based charity Suited for Success. They believe helping unemployed men and women with interview skills and a suitable interview outfit will give them the confidence they need to make that positive first impression and get a job that could change their life.

When going for a job interview everyone wants to make a good impression.  But what if you've been unemployed for a long time or you're struggling to get by on benefits or you've recently been homeless or released from prison and you can't afford a suit or smart clothing for that crucial interview?

Find out what makes this charity so exceptional.

Show Notes Transcript

I speak to the hugely motivational Patricia White who is the CEO of Birmingham based charity Suited for Success. They believe helping unemployed men and women with interview skills and a suitable interview outfit will give them the confidence they need to make that positive first impression and get a job that could change their life.

When going for a job interview everyone wants to make a good impression.  But what if you've been unemployed for a long time or you're struggling to get by on benefits or you've recently been homeless or released from prison and you can't afford a suit or smart clothing for that crucial interview?

Find out what makes this charity so exceptional.

Unknown Speaker :

Good morning. Good afternoon. Good evening, however you are listening to us on this episode of leadership bytes. It's great to have you here. So I'm speaking to Patricia White, who is the CEO of Birmingham based charity suited for success. Patricia is somebody who believes in helping unemployed men and women with interview skills and a suitable interview outfit that will give them the confidence they need to make that positive first impression and get a job that will basically change their life. And I was really, really excited to have her on the podcast. I actually live in the Birmingham area. And because of my background, when my father was a bespoke tailor, I was really fascinated by the work that she does. It got my attention, I've started to do some work with her. And I'm really wanted to do my bit in terms of promoting the charity itself. Patricia herself is a very impactful person. She has an absolute belief in doing the right thing to enable people to take those steps forward to their own personal integrity and the next steps in their life to reclaim control of who it is and what they're about. You really understand that she has this idea Davis says it's basically more than a suit. The work that she does with ex forces ex offenders back to work mums and the homeless really sets a standard for enabling people to redefine their own validity and to have helped them that support mechanism around their ability to reclaim that place not just in society, but to take control of their own life. Let's hear from Patricia and I think you're gonna find this really interesting podcast Welcome to leadership bites with your host Guy Bloom, a leadership podcast conversations, just me talking and the occasional interviews. Check us out at living brave, calm, and when you enjoy the episode, subscribe and tell everyone. So Patricia, fantastic to have you with me today. I've done a little introduction just as a lead in but I think I'd really like to just hear in your own words, what is suited for success just as a summary because we'll talk about it in depth afterwards and then just the stepping stones that took To be the CEO of this great charity. Absolutely. Thank you so much Guy for the invitation. It's great to be with you today suited for success. As you know, I'm the chief executive and we're a Birmingham based charity but still quite young. We're still babies. We've only been going for just over three years. And so for success is a really simple concept. We're in the business of changing lives helping to impact on employment, and then the way we do that is providing free interview closing and interview preparation skills for people to give a great first impression at a job interview. In a nutshell, that's what's suited for successes in terms of how I got to be the cheapest. I've always had a passion for communities making a difference changing lives and previous I ran Trussell trust Food Bank. I ran one of the first Trussell trust food banks in the city could Birmingham central Food Bank, run that for five years and while running the food bank and doing various other community projects across Birmingham across the city, Working with various charities, community organizations and looking at the various issues across the city and various challenges that people have on the edges of society in a communities right across our city and across the UK, I started to really look at well running the food bank is that well, if people can't afford to put food on the table, how on earth are gonna look for to be able to buy an interview outfit to make themselves presentable to make that first impressions count in a job interview. So that's how the idea of suited for success started really started around me supporting people with emergency food to thinking Well, actually, the root of the reason why you can't put food on the table is because of unemployment and why you weren't employed is because you can't get through job interviews, have a great CV, a great application, and actually just put yourself forward as the best candidate for that particular role. So that's what suited for success is all about. I've been in the eyes of charity for the last, let's say 1012 years and before that, I will As a journalist at the BBC, I was in journalism for 10 years where I had the pleasure and the opportunity to travel across the world with the BBC World Service and various aspects of the BBC as a journalist, my love for people and communities really stemmed from being a journalist and being out and about and getting great human interest stories and just seeing the challenges and the topics and the headlines that we see in everyday news, and that's where my passion and compassion really grew for people and to support and help people, you know, I have to say, because when I first saw success, I think it was on LinkedIn, I saw one of your posts, and it just pulled me in straightaway. So as you know, my father used to be a bespoke tailor in the Birmingham area. So by definition, I felt this natural whap a little bit of an affinity and then when I met you, and I saw the setup, it was quite what I was going to say kind of hooked me in straight away. It's such a on the surface. It's such a simple Data enable people to look their best. So they can have a successful job interview. And then that could be the starting point of something amazing for them. So easy to say, put clothes on people, give them some help with interview go, how hard could it be, but actually, what I did very quickly realized was the level of dedication of the team, the overall professionalism of the processes that were being adhere to. And I think that really told me that this is something that is really set up for a long term impact. And I guess what I'm also interested in is I can see the stepping stones of how you move forward to end up in that role. And that seems really obvious almost that you'd end up doing something like this. It's the hand in the glove, it's the right one for you. What were the stepping stones to the idea of it to it being what I see is a very slick, professional high end operation. How did he go from you going? Do you know what I'm gonna do through to where you are there? I mean, every time I tell this story, people think oh my gosh, It was meant to be because when I managed the Trussell trust Food Bank and Trussell trust do an amazing job in the UK around food poverty and the food banks that they wrote, though, I would think like I'd mentioned, if you can't afford to put food on the table, how you're going to afford an interview suit and a lot when it comes to food banks, a lot of donations that are lost support comes through businesses or business professionals offices that do food drives in their offices where their people come to work and donate a ton of beans or, you know, tuna, corned beef or tuna tuna. And so I thought, well, if people are donating food items, wouldn't it be fantastic for to ask people to donate clothing items as well. So people in offices, they wear suits and smart clothing every day. So what could we ask them to donate clothing items as well as food items. So within the same time of me thinking about that particular concept, I had a phone call and an email from a group of young professionals that worked in various corporate businesses and law firms and banks in the city. That said we've come up with this idea of seed For Success, where we'd like our colleagues to donate work where so that you can support people that come to your food bank to prepare for job interviews. Oh, well, guy, I just I couldn't believe it because it's almost as if I kind of put the idea out there. Yeah, to the universe. And then the universe goes, yes. Okay. there's a there's a response. Here you go. He's everything. esteem prophecy was, yeah, I couldn't believe it. So that's how it all started. So it's a set for success has always been a platform for the corporate and the business sector to work together with the bad sector to come together to impact on employment. And that's how it all started. And so the kind of the level of excellence and the service that we give to our clients is all stems from that relationship, you know, six, seven years ago, which still continues to this day. So we still very much work with the corporate and business sector in order to run suited for success and we couldn't do what we do without that support. And that's how It all came together God Wow. When you say something like that it's almost one of those universe giving moments isn't it? Like it we see the movie in the Oh, it's nothing else could top this and then something happens. Yeah. And that kind of access then into organizations to say almost can we have your suit? Was that facilitated by the people that initially had that first port of call to you? Or was that you just saying on LinkedIn, I'd like to come and speak to you had to do those stepping stones because having come to the site, it's amazing was wracked of high quality clothing that anybody be proud to put on? How did you start to build the racks when the big group of young professionals approached me with the idea of suited for success we did a pilot so that they suited for success originally was the six month CSR project with businesses and us working together, collecting a few suits came out putting people into employment and the pilot was more or less about, let's create a space where people can donate It was a bit of a suit drive a bit of a campaign. And that's how suited for success was launched as a as a pilot project. And then it's just all stems from there really and the fact that it's a win win for businesses that everybody wears smart work, wear and suits in the office. And this is a great initiative to be able to give that workwear to that we no longer wear, it's all clogging up our wardrobes and closet. So if we donate our smart workwear, we then also have to serve the of the issue of unemployment, and we can go out and get new suit and new clothes. So yeah, so it was a win win. So that that kind of concept, and that that process has stayed with us. And we don't have to actually go out and ask for donations we get we have to at the moment have actually paused donations because we have so many donations, and we're talking about fantastic quality suits. Sometimes we look at donations and we think how is that Somebody donated the seats. Yeah. My father being a tailor. Yeah, he was a bespoke tailor made made suits. I walked in the rack went, Oh my God, this these are better than the ones I've ever wardrobe. So yes, there was it was incredible and it was a lovely and that was lovely to see that what was really happening was quality of it was part of the process because I think when you put a suit on even if you're not an expert on what it is, the quality of the thing is different to the way that you are especially if you're not used to holding one and wearing one in the fit of it makes that difference. Absolutely. I mean, we get clients that say you know, when they when we put suits on them, we've had clients in tears and they'll say I've never I've worn suits before but I've never looked like this in a suit. I've never had this sort of quality of saved and like you say it makes that person feel valued makes them feel special. It makes them feel part of society with something as simple as a suit. That's what's powerful about it. It really is. And one of our hashtags is that we're more than just a saved. And we live by that. Yes, I love that. I almost want to talk about that little bit of touch points I've had with you as my experience, but actually, that would be me talking about you what you do so who is going to be approaching you for a suit? And when we say suit, we mean male and female, to make that obvious statement, somebody approaches you What's the relative criteria to come to your services? What would they expect as an experience? What what are the stepping stones that somebody might go to, to then walk out the door ready for that interview they've got this afternoon? Absolutely. I mean, to serve anybody who is unemployed, whether they they'd lost their job a week ago, or they've not worked for 10 years or say, so anybody who's unemployed is fits the criteria of being able to come to see to for success and get support from us. We work with frontline agencies, Job Centers, homeless hostels, women's refugees, children's centers to support those frontline agents. sees who are supporting people to get into work. But there may also be supporting people for other challenges that are happening in their life around addiction, just coming out of prefer, etc, etc. So people get referred to us once they have a guaranteed job interview here and then they feel Oh, well, what am I going to wear to that interview? I've got nothing in my wardrobe to wear. Now we're suited for success. Step six is that we think don't not go for that interview or go to that interview in a pair of jeans and a T shirt hoping you can explain why you're in casual wear, and hopefully you'll get the job but let us prepare you for that job. Matt, let us make you look the part for that job to that hurdle is job takeover. And then all you've got to think about and focus on is actually answering the interview questions and giving that great first impression. We will support anybody who's on employed or to support them into work. Walk me through the process of when somebody knocks on that door presses that buzzer, they're greeted at the door and just almost that process because I imagine for some people Well I know that having been in they're coming with different levels of competencies. Some people have an inherent confidence and others are at a place in their life maybe where they're not our premises. Our center looks like a department store so people think that they could just walk in off the street. A lot of people think we're just a shop and we say no, you have to be referred for us to provide support for you. So people are referred, they come to our center based in Hockley in the centre of Birmingham and then when they come to the door, we can invite them in but you it's almost like the clients are like rabbits and headlights, because when they're invited in we treat them special we found user we said we want to support you to be successful in your job interview everything from the welcome offering cups of tea or coffee sitting down. He's a magazine haven't read of a magazine. Let's talk about you. Who were you Where have you come from? Why you weren't employed? How can we support you today and it's a one to one appointment. So it's even though we look like a shop and it feels like a shop besides people In a shop, you just don't go around the rails and pick what you want is a bespoke service. So once we've had a little chat with them about them about them preparing for their job interviews, we do some coaching with them. We talk about the sort of interview that they're going for everything down to what times your interview, how are you going to get there? Where is your interview, and you'd be so surprised that clients haven't even thought that far ahead. They've just thought about what let's just get the clothes in and I'll be fine. Well never never how are you going to get there? How are you preparing yourself for the interview and then once we've gone through that, that's an hour the whole appointment is two hours of just over two hours and then they have a personal stylist that will then dress them for the interview that they're going for a week go as far as doing color analysis with people fitting suits and clothing to their style and then their personality, their likes their dislikes. So it's not just a case of well Here you go. I think this is the right size suit for you. There it is in the back and off you go. It's that one to one personal styling and personal service that We do offer people I think that's the bit that I found really important that it wasn't just come and get a suit. Yeah it was that sense of care and customization for the one of the better word because the guys and girls that are in there really understand there from local businesses as well. And some of the I'm not just gonna say people I'm gonna say characters because they have real character are great characters, and they're experts in their field. They really are there in the tray, they're able to look at somebody and know the size of the individual which is pretty impressive. To know this is going to look right on you. I think that's also part of the process that you're looking at another adult that is looking at you with expertise and you may not know you may be slightly worried about it want a suit in 20 years or my whole life or I have but I've never really felt comfortable in them but somebody else who you can trust going no, trust me you're not really good. Yeah, that's that's quite palpable. I think and quite powerful. It is absolutely and people feedback that we've had from people is that I've never been treated like this before. I've never been spoken like this before. And the way that you know we Polish people shoes, we get down on our knees, we Polish shoes, we do ties, we talk about grooming, and also and it really, really does touch people. It really does throw people that they, how much we care about them as human beings, and as people where they probably come from backgrounds and experiences where that hasn't happened for them. And then also in terms of the our volunteer team. We come from various different backgrounds, whether there be a background in retail, in styling, and when we have gentlemen that have worked in men's retail tile, sorry for many years and are able to dress people because that's what they've done for a living but also in terms of our volunteers that support people with interview skills and techniques. We've got business owners, we've got business managers, HR consultants, we work with a variety of different businesses that send that staff on corporate volunteer days that come with a wealth of knowledge and experience that is just so valuable that you just couldn't put a price on it. And then VCs, then working with people that have never had this sort of knowledge and experience before, and they're appreciate that to be able to move them forward in their lives. Yes. And I think that's something that is really tangible, the expertise and the knowledge, the expertise, but the fact that anybody I've seen in that brief touch point I've had with you had a genuine desire to be there and add value. On a personal note, one of the things I noted and I've only done so save very lightly touched your organization, you will very graciously got me in to do just one little session of doing some interview techniques with some of the clients and I even like the fact that their clients right just has something about it. What really struck me at quite a human level of the word suspicion jumped into my head and that's not what I meant, but I think some people are maybe suspicious of that process. So sometimes almost comp I just have the suit, right? Yeah. And some of them instinctively Want some help. But some of them are, am I going to be trained? Am I going to be preached to Oh God, I got to sit here and just go through this. And then very, very quickly because the person genuinely listens and cares, they very quickly shift to almost that sense of appreciation of, oh, you're not just quickly trying to do tell me some are some open questions. You're genuinely saying, What's this about? What are you trying to get out of it? Who do you want to be when you're in there and you're really just like that suit that you're about to put on me? Even this is bespoke for me. And I think that really makes a connection that tells them almost at that first point of contact, yeah, this is different. And the bit that really struck me was I just like your commentary on it because you must have seen 1000 of these is when they put the suit on and they come back to see the person that interviewed them who hasn't seen them being dressed and I was struck by the look of it. Almost as if somebody put your cell batteries inside, they were beaming. And they were just, oh my god, it was electric. There was almost pride. They wanted to say, look, look at me like I believe it. I guess you save a lot of time. I guess it never gets tired. It doesn't actually go. I'm feeling quite emotional and sat here listening to you because we're in it. We're in it day in and day out. But it's fantastic to hear it. hear from somebody from the outside looking in as well. And just thinking as you're talking, just thinking about some of the clients that we've seen and the tears and the gratitude. It is incredible to see that transformation because we care. We care about people, we care about people's lives and we want to make a difference. One example comes to mind is we will supporting a gentleman when he brought his tube normally we don't have children come but he couldn't find a sitter. So he had two boys for the day and they were about 10 1112 and so dad was an ex offender and on the Data he came to sue for success he actually had a tag on his ankle and so he came in tracksuit bottoms trainers t shirt, you know, that sort of thing that sort of look. So we dressed him in a suit, he's lads sat on the sofa really patiently waiting for dad chatting away reading magazines. When dad came out of the changing room, you should have seen the look on their faces. And I would never forget that look and the look from dad. It's a look at Dad, dad's gonna now sort himself out from changing my life. You can be proud of your dad and the look on the faces of his young boys going, Oh, dad, we're so proud of you. We're so pleased you look amazing and, and that's within half an hour of dressing me in a suit and things and getting them suitable for and then he actually not only his physical appearance to the boys And to me, that's it. I'm going to get my life sorted. I'm going to get my life back on track. I want to make my boys proud. I'm going to get myself a job I'm going to be you know, honestly now it was just an incredible sight to see. That's what we're really about. And we see that I'm Diane. And we can probably tell from me talking as well. We just love what we do. And it really is changing lives. And I was privileged to hear a couple of people's stories. And some of them had me just going, right. Okay, I know, I'm only going to be with you for a very short time, but I already care. I really want to give off myself to enable that. So yeah, it's a genuine thing. I think for a lot of people that are on the periphery, doing some sort of charity work, I think it's very easy to like a post on social media, right? To have an opinion from a distance, I have a sense that we're very often very disconnected from anything that's not in our immediate space. So to an AI Am I happy? You know, there's no question about it. I have not had these points of contact. So it did reconnect me with an element of my humanity. Yes, that's important. I think that's something that I recognized in the contribution you Able to not do your bit inverted commas but you're able to reconnect with that human element of yourself to say, well actually, I probably live a pretty privileged life. And in terms of problems, I've got first world problems here. The microwave broken Can I get to Argus in time for dinner to get another one is not really an issue. And I think a lot of that really struck home, one of the things I started to say to people is you don't have to dedicate yourself as a life's work. There are other people doing that. But I think there is an element if everybody did a little bit, it would make one heck of a difference. Absolutely. Absolutely. What happens next for people, they go and have the interview, they get the job or they potentially don't get the job. What's the follow up services for somebody that have got my one suit, but that's the only thing in my wardrobe, what happens for them next, in terms of if they land, the job and any support that they might get moving forward? Yeah, so I mean, when we originally settled, it was just about Claiming it's about supporting people into or for interviews that will then take them into employment. And so we give them a free seat. And we do some free entry coaching. And that was kind of what we did is and in a nutshell, as we develop as a charity, we are noticing that people actually do need the additional support once they've got the job, especially for those people that have been unemployed for quite a long time. We can't expect people to go from five years of unemployment and straight into employment and it'll be an easy and smooth transition. So as a charity, we're now looking at how we support people while they're in employment, especially within those first three months is a simple things like well, who do I speak to about if I need to take my child to the doctor's one morning? I can't get to work on time or who do I talk to about holidays? Or who do I talk to about travel expenses and just no any maybe issues that they may have for the first few weeks in employment about talking to colleagues in their team and things like that, and also, like you say the financial side of things. About buy new clothes for work, and how do I now pay my own rent and my own bills and things. Whereas before the government paid for all of that, and I think that's a gap at the moment. That's what's missing. So many people either look at that gap and go, I can't, I can't jump that gap. I'd rather stain on an employment stay on benefits, because that's too big a gap for me, or people start to drop the gap. But then they fall through the gap because there's no support and no mechanism, no net to catch them. So suited for success is going to be stepping into that gap. And we're developing ways to do that. But yes, we do offer people support if they didn't get the job so you can come back have some more coaching and we've recently had a lady who got a job during lockdown, which is a miracle which is fantastic. And you took a few attempts, quite a few coaching sessions and confidence workshops and a CV update and things like that, but she got the job as a support worker for Trident reach to our charity in Birmingham. So we're happy to keep working with people they can have as many coaching sessions as they need. They can have as much advice telephone email or even come in and have a chat with us over a cup of tea that they need to support them into employment some people it will just be one coaching session there you go they've got the job for other people it will need a little bit more work to get to that point. So that's what we do offer that as a service again be more than just a saved love that yeah, I think that also that sense of support and a sense of they may not fully understand it when they walk through the door but leaving knowing Oh, I can come back i think that's that's a very powerful confidence. I think just I'm not in almost I forgive even come back and tell them about it, which means maybe I'm not alone in this process. As I walk off I feel as if these people have got my back kind of thing. Absolutely. And that's because of the rapport that we built up was when we saw that the client for their appointments and it could be it was only a 10 hour appointment two hours slot we saw them for but then we showed such care and built up such a report that they feel they can come back one other example quick example. I can give you so somebody went for a job. They were in the lab as a technician got the job, but then he couldn't get any support from the Job Center to help to cover his rent to help with even things like lunch money, being able to buy lunch, and like sandwiches and things at lunch, and also a pair of shoes and things like that. So he came to us absolutely desperate, he was in tears. And he said, I can't get a break. I've got the job of pet successfully got through the interview. And now struggling on the other side of that. He said, I don't want to go there looking like I'm poor. I have been poor and I have been living in poverty. And now I got the opportunity to turn my life around. But I don't want to go there with people looking at me, like my past. And so we were able to help him with work clothing, we were able to support him with a test go back to where we could buy bread and sandwich fillings and things and even buy my bus pass and that's all it took to help him jump that gap. Just things like that, that we're looking at developing To be able to support people once they've gained employment, which is the support that's missing. So one thing you've also mentioned military personnel to me and you've mentioned that work that you're doing with people that are entering the world from maybe a long term experience in another almost ecosystem. Some of them have found that transition difficult and not in the best place. What would you do then with those x forces and x services people? Yeah, so our x forces work is an arm we've been developing over a number of years as three client groups that we work we do some bespoke work with and we go the extra mile with to the ex forces ex offenders and also back to work moms that experience particular challenges going into employment. So our work with the x forces has been incredible. We work with some incredible charities that already support x forces, the poppy factory royal British Legion, walking with the wounded Safa all of those charities who work We don't do it in a silo, we actually work with others. And that's very much about what we're about. It's about creating a platform where we bring people together to work together in collaboration to make a difference to our work with the x forces, we have x forces days where we have a corporate volunteer group that will spend the day with suti for success doing some coaching and a one to one mentoring session with our x forces clients. And those clients are referred to us for a variety of various x forces, charities, they spend the day with us, having looked at their CVS, doing a little bit of coaching, some interview coaching, and then we also dress and style them for job interviews that they may have coming up the may not have a guaranteed job interview coming up, but many of them are actively looking for employment. And one of the areas that we talked about and we look at supporting is that when you're in the forces, you don't have to go for a job interview. You don't have to create a CV, you just go for various roles, you get the role, and then you're in it now when they've come out to the forces as all this crap CV for that application forms Have an interview. And also the love the language that's used in the forces doesn't really translate into, they call it civvy Street. So they really struggle with the language barriers and how to communicate their skills and experience. And a lot of them have incredible skills and experience that they've gained while in the forces. We help them translate those skills and how to put themselves across in job interviews. And we've had some great success stories that you can read about on our Facebook page and our website and things of people once they've come to our ex forces days. They've been successful in getting jobs. We've recently had somebody who he was quite suicidal and we hear those stories a lot. We had somebody call a friend of his call and say, could you please help my friend called he's really struggling. He really thought he got this job. He had an interview a few days before he didn't get the job and he was quite depressed because on our x force, his day he came in thinking, you know what, I'm not sure what you're going to be able to do for me. He left that day. The next day, he got an invitation for a job interview, and within a few days, got the interview and he got the job. And he was just he couldn't believe it is I couldn't believe what happened within the space of a few days for me wanting being suicidal to me actually engaged in employment. And we've got many, many stories like that. I think that's the power of it, isn't it? If people are thinking of how they may help or contribute, there might be obvious or less obvious ways, what would be a value to you? How would you want them to approach you? What is it that you might be looking for? What might you be looking for help with this might be a great opportunity just to put that into the universe. I mean, there's the obvious things like a suit donations, which we're always really grateful for, and volunteering with us as a regular volunteer and joining our team as a volunteer or whether it's one off volunteer in so it could be that you have a certain number of days as part of your role, your job where you can go out and volunteer for a charity and you choose to to for success as that charity so we see you a couple of times during that year, but I think What I would really love to put out there is that we would love people to invest in suited for success, whether it be financially, whether it be their skills and experience and their background that they personally have come from after hearing this interview, if you think, gosh, I'd really love to get involved, but more than just volunteer or more than just donate a suit or two out me wardrobe. I would love to have a conversation with you about that. We are looking for people to invest in what we do, and to be part of a team of whether you be a patron or an ambassador facility for success, or sit as part of our board as well to look at how can we be a little bit more scalable? How can we really show an impact in the work that we're doing and help us with our strategic thinking? So it's not just about asking for money. Of course, money is important because we have to pay the bills, not everybody, but we are looking for people to actually invest in us to actually support us in a bigger way. Well, I'll make sure that I put contact details at the end. I would actually suggest that people go to suited for success.co.uk forward slash client dash makeovers client makeovers, just the first couple of pictures suck you straight up the before and afters. I'm just looking at them now with a massive smile over my face. You get it when you see how somebody walked in, you've got the before and after. But inject two hours of effort here and look what's coming at at the other end. It's very, very powerful. So on that note, I'm going to bring this to a close, it's been an absolute joy to speak to you. So thank you for making the time on what seems to be becoming increasingly hotter days in the UK. Especially when you lock yourself away for a quiet podcast and you shut all the windows. So I was I was yesterday I was chasing a fly around the room. The other day that seems to be able to fly in through a one inch gap. Fly out the door and the two windows and I've left over for it to get that Losing my marbles but the last time we spoke there were birds in the background as well. Beautiful it's a beautiful thing but we got it we can't have him on the podcast far too late so on that note, I'm gonna bring this to an end and we'll just stay on the line have a little chat afterwards but thank you very much Patricia Thank you God. So that was Patricia white the CEO of suited for success I find her hugely motivational, thoroughly engaging and the cause is one that really is something that I can really engage with and I hope you do too. You can contact Patricia at suited for success co.uk visit the website there's a real sense of clarity about what they're doing and you can reach out to her on that we have some other guests lined up as well performance SEO for my cab calf possum, my SEO recruiting group for the British Army Major General Paul nansen, commandant of Sandhurst, and Dave Auric. The HR group and others are Well that are coming online. If you're enjoying please subscribe tell people about us and promote the podcast as much as you can. That's my call to arms because you know, we're new we're trying to get off the ground and it's exciting times for us any thoughts or ideas or topics that you'd like me to cover any suggestions of people that you think would be great for me to interview? Let me know on that note, it's been a pleasure and see you on the next episode. Take care. That's it. Subscribe so you keep updated on new episodes. Visit living brave, calm. If you want to connect with us and find out more. This has been leadership bites. See you soon. Transcribed by https://otter.ai